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The Electro-Voice RE15
dynamic cardioid microphone

Electro-Voice Model RE15

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Description and Applications
The Electro-Voice RE15 is a dynamic cardioid mic created espe­cially for the most exacting professional applications. Emphasiz­ing a major technological break­through, the RE15 features a degree of directional control so effective that frequency response is virtually independent of angular location of sound source. The result is a microphone that generates no off axis coloration, yet provides greatest possible rejection of unwanted sounds. A super cardioid, the RE15 provides its greatest rejection at 150° off axis. (Typical cardioids provide greatest rejection at 180°.) This as­sures greatest rejection in the horizontal plane when the micro­phone is tilted in its most natural position—30° from hori­zontal (as on boom or floor stand). An easily operated “bass-tilt” switch corrects spectrum balance for boom use and other longer reach situations.

E-V RE15 specifications

Using the mechanical nesting concept of design—by means of which the internal transducer parts are nested one within another—the RE15 transducer is a nearly solid mechanical struc­ture that is highly resistant to damage from mechanical shock. The exclusive non-metallic Electro-Voice Acoustalloy® dia­phragm is virtually unaffected by extremes of atmospheric con­ditions. A carefully designed steel outer case provides excel­lent magnetic shielding, and additional mechanical protection. Finish is nonreflecting matte satin nickel.

E-V RE15 dimensions

E-V RE15 frequency response

E-V RE15 polar response

E-V RE15 wiring diagram

Quoted from Electro-Voice Engineering Data, Part No. 533688, 1967.

Electro-Voice RE15 in its case

Electro-Voice Model RE15

Electro-Voice Model RE15

Electro-Voice Model RE15

Electro-Voice Model RE15

Electro-Voice Model RE15

E-V RE15 Data Sheet
Download the Engineering Data Sheet for this mic.

Fact sheet
From time to time Electro-Voice would publish Microphone Facts for the operating engineer, a series of newsletter-styled three-ring binder-punched bulletins that described new products. Here is an example from August, 1967, which announces the Model RE15. It is six pages in length, and is formatted for high-resolution printing on 8½ × 11-inch paper. It is a 4.6-megabyte PDF.
 

 

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